Homeless Friend, Ending Homelessness in America

Educating people about homelessness

Homeless Teens

Children under 18 account for 39% of the homeless population

Homeless Teen Statistics

Homeless Teens Statistics & Facts Homeless Teen Facts Homeless Teen Hotline Homeless Youth & Teen Statistics & Facts Approximately 1.7 million young people call the streets home every year. Nearly 20,000 homeless people 24 years old and younger live in New York City. Children under 18 accounted for 39% of the homeless population. Of that number, approximately 42% were younger than age 5. Approximately 40% of homeless youth identify as LGBT. Every year, approximately 5,000 homeless young people will die because of assault, illness, or suicide while trying to survive. What are the cause of youth and teen homelessness? Young people are at far greater risk of becoming homeless if: Their parents engage in substance abuse or have mental health problems. They suffered or witnessed child abuse or neglect in the home. The family has been homeless previously. They identify themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender. They have been in foster care. Children who have been in foster care are at greater risk of becoming homeless at an earlier age and to remain homeless for a longer period of time than other youth. How is child abuse related to youth and teen homelessness? 46% of homeless youth escaped a home where they suffered physical abuse. 17% left because of sexual abuse. What happens to homeless youth and homeless teens on the streets? Young people who are too old for foster care, yet too young to apply for social services are often forced into homelessness. Homeless youths can face devastating short and long-term consequences. Nearly 43% of homeless young men and 39% of homeless young women say they were assaulted... read more

“Everybody Can Help Somebody” by Ron Hall

  Everybody can help somebody—even you! “I used to spend a lotta time worryin’ that I was different from other people . . . But I found out everybody’s different—the same kind of different as me.” Little Denver grew up very poor, and he didn’t get to go to school. As time passed, Denver decided to hop a train to the big city for a different life. But that life was difficult, and Denver spent many years as a homeless man. But God showed His love through two people who were very different from Denver. Based on Same Kind of Different As Me, the emotional tale of Denver Moore’s life story, this unique children’s book includes Denver’s original art. Parents and children alike will be moved by this powerful story and will never forget the unexpected and life-changing things that can happen when we help somebody. “Nobody can help everybody, but everybody can help somebody.” Meets national education standards.   “Everybody Can Help Somebody” by Ron... read more

Homeless Veterans

One Out of Four Homeless Men Are Veterans

Homeless Veteran Statistics

One out of four homeless men are veterans. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) states that the nation’s homeless veterans are predominantly male, with roughly 8% being female. The majority are single; live in urban areas; and suffer from mental illness, alcohol and/or substance abuse, or co-occurring disorders. About 12% of the adult homeless population are veterans.

Roughly 40% of all homeless veterans are African American or Hispanic, despite only accounting for 10.4% and 3.4% of the U.S. veteran population, respectively.

Homeless veterans are younger on average than the total veteran population. Approximately 9% are between the ages of 18 and 30, and 41% are between the ages of 31 and 50. Conversely, only 5% of all veterans are between the ages of 18 and 30, and less than 23% are between 31 and 50.

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Homeless Statistics

40,000 Homeless People will Die on the Streets of America This Year

About Homeless Friend

  Homeless Friend is dedicated to bringing awareness to the challenges the homeless face on the streets every day. We strive to bring people together to end poverty and homelessness in America. We share homeless facts and statistics regarding homeless veterans, homeless teens and homelessness in America. We provide – and post – information on social media and proved organizations with material to help them accomplish their mission to end homelessness. Thank you for your support. Please like and share our posts about homelessness on social media and make sure you subscribe to the Homeless Friend Newsletter to stay informed on the issues and help end homelessness in America. Sincerely, Homeless Friend  ... read more

Homeless Veteran Statistics

One out of four homeless men are veterans. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) states that the nation’s homeless veterans are predominantly male, with roughly 8% being female. The majority are single; live in urban areas; and suffer from mental illness, alcohol and/or substance abuse, or co-occurring disorders. About 12% of the adult homeless population are veterans.

Roughly 40% of all homeless veterans are African American or Hispanic, despite only accounting for 10.4% and 3.4% of the U.S. veteran population, respectively.

Homeless veterans are younger on average than the total veteran population. Approximately 9% are between the ages of 18 and 30, and 41% are between the ages of 31 and 50. Conversely, only 5% of all veterans are between the ages of 18 and 30, and less than 23% are between 31 and 50.

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Homeless Teen Statistics

Homeless Teens Statistics & Facts Homeless Teen Facts Homeless Teen Hotline Homeless Youth & Teen Statistics & Facts Approximately 1.7 million young people call the streets home every year. Nearly 20,000 homeless people 24 years old and younger live in New York City. Children under 18 accounted for 39% of the homeless population. Of that number, approximately 42% were younger than age 5. Approximately 40% of homeless youth identify as LGBT. Every year, approximately 5,000 homeless young people will die because of assault, illness, or suicide while trying to survive. What are the cause of youth and teen homelessness? Young people are at far greater risk of becoming homeless if: Their parents engage in substance abuse or have mental health problems. They suffered or witnessed child abuse or neglect in the home. The family has been homeless previously. They identify themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender. They have been in foster care. Children who have been in foster care are at greater risk of becoming homeless at an earlier age and to remain homeless for a longer period of time than other youth. How is child abuse related to youth and teen homelessness? 46% of homeless youth escaped a home where they suffered physical abuse. 17% left because of sexual abuse. What happens to homeless youth and homeless teens on the streets? Young people who are too old for foster care, yet too young to apply for social services are often forced into homelessness. Homeless youths can face devastating short and long-term consequences. Nearly 43% of homeless young men and 39% of homeless young women say they were assaulted... read more

Homeless Shelters

40,000 Homeless People will Die on the Streets of America This Year

Hobo Symbols & Codes

During the great depression people that rode the trains between migrant jobs came to be called “Hobos”. In their travels, they learned to leave notes for each other, giving information on the best places to camp or find a meal, or dangers that lay ahead. This unique Code was known to the brotherhood of freight train riders and used by all. To this day you will find some of these codes still in use.

The signs were typically drawn on utility poles using charcoal or with some other temporary writing material that would wash out.

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DOJ Asks Jude to Block Enforcement of Homeless Camping Ban

The U.S. Justice Department on Thursday urged a judge to block enforcement of an anti-camping ordinance in Boise, Idaho making the assertion you can’t arrest someone for not complying with a law they have no ability to comply with. The homeless are frequently arrested for loitering or vagrancy but the fact is they have no where to go and now the DOJ wants to use that fact to give our homeless friends legal standing. Boise, Idaho passed an ordinance that banned sleeping or camping in public places. The DOJ says ordinances like these criminalize homelessness itself in situations where people simply have nowhere else to sleep. From the DOJ’s filing: When adequate shelter space exists, individuals have a choice about whether or not to sleep in public. However, when adequate shelter space does not exist, there is no meaningful distinction between the status of being homeless and the conduct of sleeping in public. Sleeping is a life-sustaining activity — i.e., it must occur at some time in some place. If a person literally has nowhere else to go, then enforcement of the anti-camping ordinance against that person criminalizes her for being homeless. The DOJ argues laws like this violate the Eighth Amendment protections against cruel and unusual punishment, making them unconstitutional. It’s been more than 20 years since the DOJ has weighed in on this area of of law. The fact they have now is a warning to other cities across America to treat the homelessness more humanely. The lawsuit was originally filed by National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty. Eric Tars, a senior attorney for the National... read more

“Everybody Can Help Somebody” by Ron Hall

  Everybody can help somebody—even you! “I used to spend a lotta time worryin’ that I was different from other people . . . But I found out everybody’s different—the same kind of different as me.” Little Denver grew up very poor, and he didn’t get to go to school. As time passed, Denver decided to hop a train to the big city for a different life. But that life was difficult, and Denver spent many years as a homeless man. But God showed His love through two people who were very different from Denver. Based on Same Kind of Different As Me, the emotional tale of Denver Moore’s life story, this unique children’s book includes Denver’s original art. Parents and children alike will be moved by this powerful story and will never forget the unexpected and life-changing things that can happen when we help somebody. “Nobody can help everybody, but everybody can help somebody.” Meets national education standards.   “Everybody Can Help Somebody” by Ron... read more

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